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Avoid Using EventSource (Server-Sent Events)

On January 30, 2012, in Javascript, by LuCuS

Google Chrome LogoEarlier this month, I told you about a new project I’m working on for a real-time collaboration platform. During the early stages of development, I tested several technologies to use for communicating with the platform from a web browser. Well, today I want to talk about one of those technologies and the reason it wasn’t selected. I’m talking about “EventSource” (aka “Server-Sent Events” or “SSE” for short). Even though SSE is cool and fun to learn, I would highly recommend staying away from it for anything running in a production environment. Let me explain why.

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I couldn’t agree more!

On January 27, 2012, in General, by LuCuS

2012 Presidential State of the UnionI just read this on Slashdot and wanted to re-post it as I am totally 100% on board with the original author:

“Obama’s State of the Union focused on the return of manufacturing jobs to America. This New Yorker story makes the case that the manufacturing jobs aren’t going to come back, and he should be focusing on software. Quoting: ‘Yes, there are industries where manufacturing jobs can be brought back to America through proper tax incentives and training programs. But maybe he should have talked more about the things that he could do to keep software jobs here. He spoke of federal funding for university and scientific research. But a real pro-software agenda would also include reforming patent law to stop trolling (and perhaps eliminating software patents altogether); increasing H-1B visas for highly skilled coders; stopping Congress from defunding DARPA, whose research helped create Siri, the iPhone’s talking assistant; and opening up the unused, federally owned wireless spectrum. That agenda wouldn’t bring Apple’s manufacturing jobs back, but it would help to keep the company’s coding jobs here. And it would certainly help develop “an economy that’s built to last.”‘”

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C# Woot! Off Notifier

On January 19, 2012, in C#, Programming, by LuCuS

woot! LogoYesterday, I showed you how to create a Woot! Off notifier using Python. As promised, I’m now going to show you how to create a Woot! Off notifier using C#. In case you didn’t read yesterday’s article, it basically told how I love Woot! Off’s, but hate having to constantly refresh my browser to check for new items. Instead, I decided to write a tool that does that for me. In the Python version I wrote, it only displays the item name and price. In today’s article, I’m taking it a bit further by showing you how to create a Windows Form that displays the item description along with the item name and price. And, I even show you how to display the item image and the progress bar that shows how many items are left just like on the Woot! site. So, let’s get started.

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Python Woot! Off Notifier

On January 18, 2012, in Programming, Python, by LuCuS

woot! LogoIf you’re like me, you enjoy the occasional Woot! Off. If you aren’t like me, there’s a good chance you don’t even know what a Woot! Off is. Hell, you probably don’t even know what Woot! is. If you aren’t familiar with Woot!, you should checkout an article I wrote a while back called “woot! woot! woot! woot!“. Catchy title, huh? Anyways, a Woot! Off is basically an event that happens periodically where the guys at Woot! sell off their inventory one item after the other until everything is gone. Unlike their normal routine of only having one deal a day, a Woot! Off can have several items in a short amount of time. It’s their way of cleaning house. But, you’ve gotta be quick if you want to land some of the good stuff as it goes quick! You have to constantly refresh your browser to see when something new has arrived. That’s what lead me to writing this article.

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Strong Typing vs. Loose Typing

On January 14, 2012, in Programming, by LuCuS

Strong vs WeakA few days ago, I told you about a conversation I had with some co-workers about the future of programming. One of the questions that was brought up in that conversation was should the “next programming language” be strong typed or loose typed? One of the others in the conversation completely believes that strong typing is the only way to go. Being a student of all programming languages, I have mixed feelings about this. Before I get into that, let me explain the difference between strong typed and loose typed programming.

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